sistaah talk newsletter

Issue 9, June 2018

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Page 1: Cover Story -- Let's Get Physical 

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Week of august 3, 2018

July 30, 2018

‘Vaginal rejuvenation’ laser treatments can cause burns and pain, FDA warns


The Washington Post 


The Food and Drug Administration on Monday warned against the use of "energy-based" devices for vaginal "rejuvenation" or cosmetic procedures, saying such treatments could lead to vaginal burns, scarring and chronic pain.


To read more, click here

July 30, 2018

How to make sure you stay regular


The Washington Post 


How do you know whether you’re pooping enough? In healthy people, the frequency of bowel movements has a surprisingly wide range. “Normal can be anything from three times a day to having one bowel movement every three days,” says Judy Nee, an instructor at Harvard Medical School and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center.


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July 30, 2018

Off Your Mental Game? You Could Be Mildly Dehydrated


NPR


Was it hard to concentrate during that long meeting? Does the crossword seem a little tougher? You could be mildly dehydrated.


A growing body of evidence finds that being just a little dehydrated is tied to a range of subtle effects — from mood changes to muddled thinking.


To read more, click here

July 31, 2018

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For Many College Students, Hunger 'Makes It Hard To Focus'


NPR


As students enter college this fall, many will hunger for more than knowledge. Up to half of college students in recent published studies say they either are not getting enough to eat or are worried about it.


To read more, click here

August 1, 2018

Take a Vacation From Exercise? Your Body May Not Thank You


The New York Times 


At the height of summer, naps at the beach can be alluring, and many of us may find ourselves tempted to take prolonged vacations from exercise.


To read more, click here

August 1, 2018

How to Read a Food Label


The New York Times 


Food labels can seem perplexing, and people often read them with an eye toward different things. Whether you are looking to limit your sugar, cut calories or increase your fiber intake, this guide will help you make sense of the numbers, ingredients and nutritional information packed onto that tiny box.


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week of july 27, 2018

July 21, 2018

For questions about dietary supplements, NIH website offers clear answers


The Washington Post 


How much potassium do you need? Is it worth shelling out for the botanical supplement du jour? What’s abetalipoproteinemia?


To read more, click here

July 23, 2018

Alternative Cancer Treatments May Be Bad for Your Health


The New York Times 


Herbs, acupuncture and other so-called complementary treatments for cancer may not be completely innocuous.


A new study has found that many cancer patients treat these nostrums not as a supplement to conventional treatment, but as an alternative. This, the researchers say, can be dangerous.


To read more, click here

July 24, 2018

Cauliflower, Kale and Carrots May Lower Breast Cancer Risk


The New York Times 


Eating substantial amounts of fruits and vegetables may lower the risk for breast cancer, a new study has found, and some kinds may be more effective than others.


To read more, click here

July 24, 2018

When We Eat, or Don’t Eat, May Be Critical for Health


The New York Times 


Nutrition scientists have long debated the best diet for optimal health. But now some experts believe that it’s not just what we eat that’s critical for good health, but when we eat it. 


To read more, click here

July 24, 2018

Pepperidge Farm Recalls Goldfish Crackers Amid Salmonella Scare


NPR


The snack that smiles back is at the center of some frown-worthy news.


Pepperidge Farm announced a voluntary recall of four varieties of Goldfish crackers in a press release on Monday.


To read more, click here

July 25, 2018

Exercise Makes the Aging Heart More Youthful


The New York Times 


For lifelong heart health, start exercising early in life and keep exercising often — ideally, at least four times a week, according to a remarkable series of recent studies involving hundreds of people and their hearts.


To read more, click here

Week of July 20, 2018

July 16, 2018

Heat Making You Lethargic? Research Shows It Can Slow Your Brain, Too


NPR


Can't cool off this summer? Heat waves can slow us down in ways we may not realize.


New research suggests heat stress can muddle our thinking, making simple math a little harder to do.


To read more, click here

July 16, 2018

When to Get Your Bone Density Tested


The New York Times 


Newly updated guidelines can help women decide when to have their bone density tested to determine their risk of fracture and perhaps get treatment that can lessen it. But the new guidelines may further discourage already reluctant  men from doing the same.


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July 16, 2017

Worried About Dementia? You Might Want to Check Your Blood Pressure


NPR


Every day,  Dr. Walter Koroshetz, 65, takes a pill as part of his effort to help keep his brain healthy and sharp.


The pill is his blood pressure medication. And Koroshetz, who directs the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, says controlling high blood pressure helps him reduce his risk of dementia.


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July 16, 2018

Bananas aren’t low-cal, but they’re really good for you


The Washington Post 


Americans annually eat an average of 27 pounds of bananas, which makes them the country’s most heavily consumed fruit.


But some consumers who are carb- and calorie-conscious have relegated bananas to the “do not eat” list because of the fruit’s high sugar and calorie count relative to some other fruits.


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July 18, 2018

Heart Failure May Be More Lethal in Women


The New York Times 


The incidence of heart failure has declined overall in both sexes in recent years and remains higher in men. But women are more likely to die from the disease.


A  study in the Canadian Medical Association Journal included 90,707 new diagnoses of heart failure among Ontario residents from 2009 to 2014. 


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July 18, 2018

CDC warns against eating this pasta salad. It has already sickened 21 people.


The Washington Post 


This pasta salad is being recalled by Hy-Vee because of a link to a salmonella outbreak. (Hy-Vee) 


Now it's a certain pasta salad that consumers shouldn't be eating.


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Week of July 13, 2018

July 8, 2018

Your doctor may not be the best source of nutrition advice


The Washington Post 


When Americans hear about a health craze, they may turn to their physician for advice: Will that superfood really boost brain function? Is that supplement okay for me to take?


Or they may be interested in food choices because of obesity, malnutrition or the role of diet in chronic disease.


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July 9, 2018

Sometimes Patients Simply Need Other Patients


The New York Times 


When Jodie Ofosuhene learned she had breast cancer at age 29 in 2016, she got more than standard medical care. She was connected with Noel Peters, a former patient who serves as a mentor to new ones. “Noel helped me tremendously,”  Ms. Ofosuhene said in an interview. “Every time I had a question about my response to treatment — whether it was normal — she had answers from her own experience.” 


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July 10, 2018

The Power of Positive People


The New York Times 


Are you spending time with the right people for your health and happiness?

 

While many of us focus primarily on diet and exercise to achieve better health, science suggests that our well-being also is influenced by the company we keep. Researchers have found that certain health behaviors  appear to be contagious and that our social networks — in person and online — can influence  obesity, anxiety and overall happiness. A recent report found that a person’s exercise routine  was strongly influenced by his or her social network.


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July 10, 2018

Breaking Down a Groundbreaking Breast Cancer Trial


U.S. News 


Breast cancer death rates have dropped dramatically over the past 15 years. This is largely due to more widespread screening to detect cancer at its earliest stages, as well as the use chemotherapy and hormonal therapy after surgery to reduce the risk of cancer recurrence  in other parts of the body.


To read more, click here


July 11, 2018

Obesity Keeps Ballooning in U.S., With Rural Areas Seeing Biggest Spikes


U.S. News


Obesity poses a stubborn public health problem. Just when it looked like rates were finally starting to plateau, results from an ongoing national survey tell a different story. Rather than losing weight, Americans – kids and adults alike – are still gaining. Rural areas  are seeing the biggest spikes. Globally, the obesity epidemic also continues. The expected impact is greatly concerning because  obesity increases the risk of  diabetes, heart disease and certain types of  cancer. 


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Week of June 22, 2018

June 15, 2018

What Is HER-2-Positive Breast Cancer?


U.S. News 


All cancers have one thing in common: They're an overgrowth of cells that are behaving abnormally because of a genetic change. Genes contain the codes that run how our cells work, and if there's a mistake in the code, that can lead to problems. In breast cancer specifically,  the disease can result from several different genetic alterations, and treating your specific disease effectively requires your doctor to determine which alterations have been involved.


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June 16, 2018

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The pros and cons of beach running


The Washington Post


For starters, sand can be a challenge because it has an uneven surface and constantly shifts under your feet. “As you push off, you’re going to lose some of your push as the sand moves,” Vasileff said. “So, you’re  not going to be able to propel yourself forward as you would on a track or pavement.”


To read more, click here. 

June 18, 2018

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6 Yoga Poses That Seem Simple But Most People Do Wrong


U.S. News 


"Do not overthink your poses." That's advice I heard early in my yoga practice – and I shouldn't have listened. I wound up  hurting my shoulder and lower back, and my downward dog felt more like a downward spiral toward painful injuries. As I learned the hard way, thinking about your yoga poses is important. If you're not, you're probably doing these common poses wrong: 


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June 19, 2018

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Breast cancer could be prevented by targeting epigenetic proteins, study suggests


ScienceDaily 


Mammary glands contain two types of cells, basal and luminal, that arise from specialized stem or progenitor cells. During pregnancy or the menstrual cycle, progesterone induces basal and luminal progenitor cell numbers to expand and drive mammary gland formation. But mammary gland progenitors may also give rise to cancer. Progesterone exposure and stem cell proliferation have been linked to the development of breast cancer, and the number of progenitor cells is often elevated in women carrying mutations in BRCA1 or other genes that put them at a high risk of developing the disease.


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June 20, 2018

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How to Fend Off Mosquitoes This Summer


U.S. News 


You wake up to a beautiful summer morning, the sun is shining and you're ready to enjoy some time outdoors. You make sure to put on your sunscreen and walk outside. A few seconds later, you feel a sting on your neck and reach up – only to find a mosquito has made a delicious  breakfast of you. Ahh, the often-forgotten discomfort of summer-mosquito bites.


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Week of June 15, 2018

June 9, 2018

Dozens sickened in new multistate salmonella outbreak, this time traced to pre-cut melons


The Washington Post 


At least 60 people have been sickened and dozens have been hospitalized with salmonella after tainted pre-cut melons were distributed to stores such as Walmart, Kroger, Costco and Whole Foods in several states, federal officials said.


To read more, click here. 

June 11, 2018

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7 Superfoods You Never Knew Were Super


U.S. News 


When you hear the term "superfoods," you may think of foods like acai, goji berries and  chia seeds. These foods do have nutritional attributes, but they also tend to be tough to find, expensive and difficult to incorporate into everyday meals. Fortunately, there are plenty of less exotic foods that are also super. Better yet, they're easy  to find, inexpensive, nutrient-rich and easy to throw into meals and snacks. 


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June 11, 2018

How Hunger Pangs Can Make Nice People 'Hangry'


NPR


Hunger can trigger cruel words from kind people.


A starved dog lover might fantasize about punting the neighbor's Chihuahua that just will not shut up. A puckish but otherwise nice person might snap at a friend, "Bring me the freaking cheesesteak before I flip this TABLE!"


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June 12, 2018

1 In 3 Adults In The U.S. Takes Medications Linked To Depression


NPR 


If you take Prilosec or Zantac for acid reflux, a beta blocker for high blood pressure, or Xanax for anxiety, you may be increasing your risk of depression.


More than 200 common medications sold in the U.S. include depression as a potential side effect. Sometimes, the risk stems from taking several drugs at the same time. Now, a new study finds people who take these medicines are, in  fact, more likely to be depressed. 


To read more, click here

June 13, 2018

Exercise vs. Standing? You Probably Need to Do Both


The New York Times 


Exercise alone is probably not enough for us to achieve and maintain good health. 


We must also try to sit less, according to a fascinating new study of the separate physiological effects that exercise and light, almost-incidental activities, such as standing up, can have on our bodies. By now, we all know that  regular exercise is good for us. 


To read more, click here

June 13, 2018

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'Betty' Casts A Quirky Light On Life After Breast Cancer

   

NPR


Yes, About Betty's Boob is a graphic novel about boobs, breasts, gazungas — those fascinating masses that exert such a stubborn influence over the human psyche. It's also about the toll of cancer,  the weightiest topic there is. But let's look at something not-so-substantial for a minute. Let's look at line.

There are innumerable ways to describe an artist's characteristic line. That's understandable, since every artist draws lines in their own unique way. An artist's line can be aggressive, persnickety, mellow or ambivalent. In Betty, French artist Julie Rocheleau's line is airy.


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Week of June 8, 2018

June 4, 2018

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Therapy Made From Patient's Immune System Shows Promise For Advanced Breast Cancer


NPR


Doctors at the National Institutes of Health say they've apparently completely eradicated cancer from a patient who had untreatable, advanced breast cancer.


The case is raising hopes about a new way to harness the immune system to fight some of the most common cancers. The methods and the patient's experience are described Monday in a paper published in the journal Nature Medicine.


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June 4, 2018

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Many women with early breast cancer may not need chemo, study finds


NBC News


Most women with early-stage breast cancer may be able to avoid chemotherapy, a new study finds.


Researchers determined that patients with smaller-sized tumors that had not spread to the lymph nodes did just as well without chemo as those who got the treatment, according to the study presented Sunday at the American Society of Clinical Oncology meeting and published in the New England Journal of Medicine.


To read more, click here

June 4, 2018

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A big question answered about treating early-stage breast cancer


The Washington Post 


One of the big questions facing women with early-stage breast cancer is whether to be treated with chemotherapy to reduce their risks that the cancer will return. A new study presented Sunday at the annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology provides much-needed clarity: Most of these women can safely skip chemo.


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June 5, 2018

Doctors Scrutinize Overtreatment, As Cancer Death Rates Decline


NPR


For many years, the death rate from cancer climbed steadily, and the focus of big cancer meetings was the quest for better treatments to bring malignancies under control. Cancer death rates have been falling in recent decades, and that's allowed researchers to ask another important question: Are some people getting too much treatment for their cancers?


The answer, from the American Society of Clinical Oncology meeting in Chicago these past few days, is an emphatic yes.


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June 6, 2018

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Weight Training May Help to Ease or Prevent Depression


The New York Times 


Lifting weights might also lift moods, according to an important new review of dozens of studies about strength training and depression. It finds that resistance exercise often substantially reduces people’s gloom, no matter how melancholy they feel at first, or how often — or seldom — they actually get to the gym and lift.


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June 7, 2018

What to Do When a Loved One Is Severely Depressed 


The New York Times 


Reports of Kate Spade’s suicide and struggle with depression have transformed her from symbol of polished prep to a blunt reminder that suffering affects all types.


Her death has inspired hundreds to tweet some version of the same message: Mental illness is nothing to be ashamed of.


To read more, click here

Week of June 1, 2018

May 25, 2018

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Why Your Health Insurer Doesn't Care About Your Big Bills


NPR


Michael Frank ran his finger down his medical bill, studying the charges and pausing in disbelief. The numbers didn't make sense.


His recovery from a partial hip replacement had been difficult. He had iced and elevated his leg for weeks. He had pushed his 49-year-old body, limping and wincing, through more than a dozen physical therapy sessions.


The last thing he needed was a botched bill.


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May 26, 2018

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Cancer Group Recommends Ditching Bacon and Booze to Stay Cancer-Free


TIME 


The World Cancer Research Fund (WCRF) has bad news for lovers of bacon and booze: Eliminating processed meats and alcohol from your diet may help reduce your risk of developing cancer.


The third report from the WCRF’s Continuous Update Project, an ongoing effort to inform consumers about lifestyle habits that may be related to cancer, provides numerous recommendations for people looking to minimize their risk of getting cancer. But two, in particular, are likely to cause a stir for many Americans.


To read more, click here

May 27, 2018

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Why it’s so dangerous to leave a kid in a hot parked car


The Washington Post 


It’s well known that a car parked outside on a hot summer’s day can turn into a scorching oven. But how much time does it take for the inside of a car to heat up to deadly temperatures?


The answer can be a matter of life and death. Every year in the United States, an average of 37 children die after being left in hot cars, according to researchers of a new study, published online last week in the journal Temperature.


To read more, click here

My 28, 2018

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How to Minimize the Risk of Food Poisoning


The New York Times 


The year is not yet half over and already there have been seven documented multistate outbreaks of food poisoning. The latest involved eggs in their shells containing salmonella and packaged chopped romaine lettuce contaminated with the especially dangerous “hamburger bug” E. coli O157:H7.


The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said the romaine outbreak involved 172 people sickened across 32 states, with one death.


To read more, click here

May 28, 2018

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Carcinogens found in regular cigarettes are in e-cigarettes, too, study finds


The Washington Post 


Teenagers who use ­e-cigarettes are ingesting many of the same carcinogens found in regular cigarettes, according to a study published recently in the medical journal Pediatrics. And those who use fruit-flavored e-cigs may be exposed to even more cancer-causing chemicals than those who use the tobacco-flavored ones.


The study was the first to measure toxins directly in the saliva and urine of teenage smokers.


To read more, click here

May 30, 2018

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Cancer Group Calls for Colorectal Cancer Screening Starting at Age 45


The New York Times 


A prominent cancer organization is for the first time recommending Americans initiate colorectal cancer screening at age 45 instead of waiting until age 50, a threshold long endorsed by many other medical groups. The new guidelines, from the American Cancer Society, would extend routine colorectal cancer screening to an additional 22 million American adults between the ages of 45 and 49 and send a clear message that colorectal cancer, which has been rising in young adults, is no longer just a disease of older people.


To read more, click here

Week of May 25, 2018

May 20, 2018

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Watching but not treating cancer can be hard. Sometimes it’s the right approach.


The Washington Post 


My sister just finished 18 weeks of chemotherapy for ovarian cancer, a slog that started six months ago when she underwent an eight-hour procedure to remove all visible signs and cells of her malignancy. From the moment her primary-care doctor suspected the diagnosis, Julie’s calendar has been chock-full of appointments: scans, bloodwork, chemo treatments and a transfusion. Now that she’s done with chemo, Julie can either enroll in a clinical trial or sit tight and participate in what is called “watchful waiting,” which includes regular bloodwork, scans and doctor visits.


To read more, click here

May 20, 2018

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Henrietta Lacks portrait goes on display at National Portrait Gallery


The Washington Post 


The National Portrait Gallery is filled with portraits of presidents and great leaders, many of whom — Barack Obama, Susan B. Anthony and others — you probably recognize.


But though a new portrait may look a bit familiar, you might not be able to place the face. She’s an African American woman, her head haloed by a straw hat, a Bible pressed against her bright red dress.


To read more, click here

May 21, 2018

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Treating Breast Cancer


The New York Times 


At 40, I received a diagnosis of ductal carcinoma in situ, or stage 0 breast cancer. I was assured that my treatment would be manageable: lumpectomy followed by radiation.


A few days after surgery, I received the news that eight millimeters of aggressive, invasive cancer had been discovered in my tumor and that I would now need additional surgery to determine if the cancer had spread to my lymph nodes and beyond.


To read more, click here

May 21, 2018

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The latest thinking on osteoporosis, which weakens bones


The Washington Post


If your doctor has suggested undergoing screening for osteoporosis — a disease that weakens bones and makes them more likely to break — there are things you should know about this common condition.


About 10 percent of Americans 50 and older have osteoporosis, and many more eventually develop a less severe form of low bone density called osteopenia, according to a 2014 review published in the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research. 


To read more, click here

May 22, 2018

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Hey, Salad Lovers: It's OK To Eat Romaine Lettuce Again


NPR 


If you've avoided romaine lettuce because of the E. coli outbreak, you can start buying it again.


After weeks of warnings from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to toss out romaine grown in the Yuma, Ariz., region, the CDC says there are no longer any greens coming from this region.


The romaine that's for sale now in restaurants and supermarkets nationwide is coming from California's Salinas Valley.


To read more, click here

May 22, 2018

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Accessing the Mental Health Benefits of Music Therapy


U.S. News 


Perhaps it was a song that struck an emotional chord with you at a particularly dark moment – or a wave of rhythm and sound that swept you up and raised your spirits. Maybe picking up a six-string or beating the drums helps you clarify some things and cut through the noise outside and inside your mind.


Whatever your relationship with music – a full embrace or more arm's length – for many the medium has the power to connect and bring not only mental clarity but healing. And beyond casual listening or playing for pleasure, that power is tapped in structured ways through music therapy.


To read more, click here

Week of May 18, 2018

May 12, 2018

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Taking The 'Journey' Through Alzheimer's Together



NPR


Pansy Greene is one of 5.7 million Americans who have Alzheimer's disease. She and her husband Winston call her illness part of their "journey" together. 


They're doing their best to live a normal life, but they've had to adjust to losses day by day and year by year. For example, Pansy doesn't cook any more. Winston points to the stove in the kitchen of their suburban home, north of Los Angeles. "No knobs," he says. "We just take off all the knobs because with this disease, Pansy might come in and turn [it] on. Gas may be escaping. Anything could happen."


To read more, click here

May 13, 2018

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Breast Reconstruction: Understanding The Women’s Health And Cancer Rights Act


Long Island Weekly


National Women’s Health Week is May 13-19, and it serves as a time for women to take control of their lives and their health at any age. While there are many illnesses and diseases that affect women, one that stands out the most is breast cancer.


A diagnosis of breast cancer profoundly impacts a woman’s life. In addition to coping with overwhelming emotions, she must make important choices about treatment and all of its implications. 


To read more, click here

May 14, 2018

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Honoring a young woman’s bravery after fatal breast cancer diagnosis



Today


Last fall, Megyn Kelly TODAY profiled Larissa Podermanksi, who had been diagnosed with fatal and incurable metastatic breast cancer. Now Larissa has died at the age of 32, and we share a look back at her life.


To read more, click here

May 15, 2018

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Gels, Foams and Purees: Cookbooks Serve Up Recipes For Those Who Struggle To Swallow


NPR


In 2007 Diane Wolff, an Asian scholar about to move from California to New York City, got a call from her mother: Dementia had made it hard to take care of herself. Couldn't Diane move to Florida instead of New York? "My mother was beautiful and headstrong, and even in her old age I thought of her like Scarlett O'Hara," says Wolff. "She needed me, and I packed up and moved to Florida."


To read more, click here

May 16, 2018

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Shorter drug treatment OK for many breast cancer patients



NBC


Many women with a common and aggressive form of breast cancer that is treated with Herceptin can get by with six months of the drug instead of the usual 12, greatly reducing the risk of heart damage it sometimes can cause, a study suggests.


It’s good news, but it comes nearly two decades after the drug first went on the market and many patients have suffered that side effect.


To read more, click here

May 15, 2018

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How Exercise Can Help You Recall Words



The New York Times 


Call them tip-of-the-tongue moments: those times we can’t quite call up the name or word that we know we know. These frustrating lapses are thought to be caused by a brief disruption in the brain’s ability to access a word’s sounds. We haven’t forgotten the word, and we know its meaning, but its formulation dances teasingly just beyond our grasp. Though these mental glitches are common throughout life, they become more frequent with age. Whether this is an inevitable part of growing older or somehow lifestyle-dependent is unknown. But because evidence already shows that physically fit older people have reduced risks for a variety of cognitive deficits, researchers recently looked into the relationship between aerobic fitness and word recall. 


To read more, click here

Week of May 11, 2018

May 6, 2018

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Why Breast Cancer is More Costly and More Devastating For Black Women


The Grio 


For Black women, a cancer diagnosis could mean facing a greater financial burden than compared to white women, according to a new study published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology, reports the New York Post.


That economic disparity can mean all the difference when it comes to treatment.


To read more, click here

May 7, 2018

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It’s Time for a New Discussion of Marijuana’s Risks


The New York Times 


The benefits and harms of medical marijuana can be debated, but more states are legalizing pot, even for recreational use. A new evaluation of marijuana’s risks is overdue.


Last year, the National Academies of Sciences, Medicine and Engineering released a comprehensive report on cannabis use. At almost 400 pages long, it reviewed both potential benefits and harms. Let’s focus on the harms.


To read more, click here

May 7, 2018

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From oatmeal to sardines, 7 foods that really can help hearts stay healthy


The Washington Post 


Eating a heart-healthy diet throughout your life can go a long way toward keeping you in top shape as you age. “In fact, heart disease is largely preventable,” says Walter Willett, a professor of epidemiology and nutrition at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. “Eating a healthy diet, combined with not smoking and exercising regularly, could prevent about 80 percent of heart disease cases.”


To read more, click here

May 7, 2018

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All Cancer Patients Should Be Prescribed Exercise, Onology Organization Recommends 


Newsweek


Cancer patients might soon get a prescription that doesn’t come in pill form: exercise.


Evidence for exercise improving health is plentiful. We know that being physically active helps people lose weight, improve their mood, get better sleep, improve their energy levels and sex drive, and reduce the risk of a wide variety of illnesses, like diabetes and heart disease. Now, doctors at the Clinical Oncology Society of Australia (COSA) are so confident in its ability to improve the lives of cancer patients that they say all doctors should prescribe it.


To read more, click here

May 7, 2018

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Now That Calorie Labels Are Federal Law, Will We Eat Less?



NPR


Well, it's official. Beginning today, all restaurant chains in the U.S. with 20 or more locations must post calories on menus or menu boards.


When Congress passed the Affordable Care Act, back in 2010, the federal calorie posting mandate was born.


Many chains, including McDonald's, Panera and Starbucks, began posting calories several years back. But the proposed regulations hit several snags as industry groups lobbied for changes. Now, there's no escaping them.


To read more, click here

May 9, 2018

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Could a Pill Help Detect Breast Cancer?




Smithsonian Magazine


Women eventually face the yearly ritual of the mammogram, usually suggested from age 50 onwards. It’s not painful, though notoriously uncomfortable, as two plates flatten the breasts, pancake-like, to get the best possible picture. The radiologist then looks at x-ray images for opaque spots that can indicate tumors.


Mammography has been used since the late 1960s and is considered the gold standard for breast cancer detection. But it’s far from perfect. The method misses about 1 in 5 cancers, and about half of women screened annually for 10 years will have a false positive result, often resulting in anxiety and unnecessary biopsies. 


To read more, click here

Week of May 4, 2018

April 28, 2018

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Homes Or Gardens? Developers And Urban Farmers Grapple Over Vacant Land


NPR


Vacant lots dot lower-income neighborhoods across the country. In many cities, urban growers have planted in those lots, repurposing abandoned city land into gardens with farmers markets and healthy food.


To read more, click here

April 30, 2018

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'You can safely forget about your cellphone' and other myth-busting truths about breast cancer


ABC News


Talking on your cellphone will not cause you to get breast cancer. 


That is just one of the myths about breast cancer dispelled by Dr. Kristi Funk in her new book, “Breasts: The Owner’s Manual.” 


To read more, click here

April 30, 2018

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Women should be tested for breast cancer at age 30, experts say


New York Post 


A mammogram at 40 may no longer be enough to combat breast cancer. The American College of Radiology and the Society of Breast Imaging are now recommending that women as young as 30 get a risk assessment — such as a genetic test — to determine what kind of formal cancer screening they need.


To read more, click here

April 30, 2018

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Fiber has surprising anti-aging benefits, but most people don’t eat enough of it


Washington Post 


Fiber gets well-deserved credit for keeping the digestive system in good working order — but it does plenty more. In fact, it’s a major player in so many of your body’s systems that getting enough can actually help keep you youthful. Older people who ate fiber-rich diets were 80 percent more likely to live longer and stay healthier than those who didn’t, according to a recent study in the Journals of Gerontology.


To read more, click here

May 1, 2018

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6 sensible, simple ways to lower your risk of breast cancer 


NBC News


The numbers sure are scary.


According to the American Cancer Society, there’s a one in eight chance that a woman in the U.S. will develop breast cancer during her lifetime. But statistics don’t tell the whole story. That’s why Megyn Kelly TODAY consulted with Dr. Kristi Funk, a board-certified breast surgeon who, alongside her husband, Andy Funk, co-founded the Pink Lotus Breast Center in Los Angeles. Funk has treated breast cancer survivor Sheryl Crow. And now, she’s written “Breasts: The Owner's Manual."


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May 2, 2018

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Love Your Cancer Doctor? Get a Second Opinion


New York Times 


You don’t think twice about getting multiple bids for a construction or plumbing project, so why hesitate on multiple “bids” for your health?

I learned the value of a second opinion a year and a half ago when two breast cancer surgeons presented me with very different treatment options.


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Week of April 27, 2018

April 22, 2018

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Do Countries That Drink Less Have Less Breast Cancer?


Mother Jones 


Earlier this month, I published a story looking at the link between alcohol consumption and cancer. The science in this area is pretty clear: Alcohol is implicated in about five percent of all cancer cases, and 15 percent of all breast cancers. The news came as a surprise to a lot of people, as it did to me when I was diagnosed with breast cancer last year. Since my story came out, I’ve had many conversations with friends, colleagues and readers all wanting to know more about their own personal risk from drinking, how much is too much, and whether it’s too late to cut back.


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April 23, 2018

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Source of E. Coli-Contaminated Romaine Lettuce still a Mystery, FDA says


Washington Post 


Eight sick prisoners in Nome, Alaska, have provided a clue to authorities about the origin of a nationwide outbreak of dangerous E. coli infections from romaine lettuce, but U.S. officials said Monday they still haven't pinpointed the source of the contamination.


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April 23, 2018

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Are G.M.O. Foods Safe?



New York Times 


It’s human nature, it seems, to resist change and fear the unknown. So it is no surprise that genetic engineering of food and feed crops resulted in their resounding condemnation as “Frankenfoods” by many consumers, who seem as terrified of eating an apple with an added anti-browning gene or a pink pineapple genetically enriched with the antioxidant lycopene as I am of self-driving cars.


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April 23, 2018

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Anxiety Relief Without The High? New Studies On CBD, A Cannabis Extract



NPR


As more states legalize marijuana, there's growing interest in a cannabis extract — cannabidiol, also known as CBD.


It's marketed as a compound that can help relieve anxiety — and, perhaps, help ease aches and pains, too.


Part of the appeal, at least for people who don't want to get high, is that CBD doesn't have the same mind-altering effects as marijuana, since it does not contain THC, the psychoactive component of the plant. 


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April 25, 2018

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This 24-Year-Old Found a Breast Cancer Lump While Getting Ready for a Night Out


People 


24-year-old Alex Whitaker was getting ready for a fun night out when she discovered a lump  in her breast. What followed was countless doctors visits, chemotherapy appointments and tough moments, with more challenges to come as she enters the next two cycles of treatment. Here, Alex tells her story in her own words, with the hope that she will raise awareness and create a community of support for young women experiencing breast cancer.


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April 25, 2018

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Surgeon, mom of 3 struck with same breast cancer as her patients: 'I was beyond shocked'


ABC News 


Dr. Anne Peled is a 37-year-old mother of three and a board-certified plastic and breast surgeon at Sutter Health California Pacific Medical Center in San Francisco, California. In November 2017, she was diagnosed with stage I breast cancer and opted for oncoplastic surgery, a revolutionary breast-conserving technique that she uses on her own patients. Now, three months after her January surgery as she settles back into her work and family life, Peled reflects on her prognosis and getting back into her rhythm, including feeling fit enough to run a 10K race over the Golden Gate Bridge on April 22. Peled tells her story to "Good Morning America" in her own words below. 


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Week of April 20, 2018

April 16, 2018

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207 Million Eggs Are Recalled Over Salmonella Fears


NPR


The Rose Acre Farms company is voluntarily recalling 206,749,248 eggs in a total of nine states, saying they "have the potential to be contaminated with salmonella braenderup" — which can sicken healthy adults and have serious and possibly fatal effects for young children and the elderly.


To read more, click here

April 16, 2018

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Cancer May Have Changed My Breasts, But It Didn't Mess With My Sexy


Glamour 


When I was diagnosed with breast cancer in May 2014, I was 28 years old, in grad school, living paycheck to paycheck as a part-time sexuality educator, and planning my wedding. I had lost my mom to breast cancer when I was 13, so I had a hunch it was coming for me, but the timing was not ideal—not that it ever is. The universe continues to remind me that life is just going to show up and it’s up to me how I respond.


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April 16, 2018

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These are the top priorities for the nation’s top cancer doctor


Washington Post 


Norman “Ned” Sharpless still remembers one of his favorite patients — a 40-ish woman with breast cancer whose chemotherapy treatment stopped working. During one visit, she told him she knew she wouldn’t be cured but hoped to live just six more years, long enough to see her 11-year-old daughter graduate from high school.


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April 16, 2018

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Weighing the Pros and Cons of Statins


The New York Times 


Are you among the 73 million Americans with cholesterol levels that current guidelines suggest should be lowered by taking a statin for the sake of your cardiovascular well-being? Have you and your doctor discussed the pros and cons of statin therapy and whether it is appropriate for your circumstances?


To read more, click here

April 16, 2018

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How to Treat Spring Allergies     


U.S. News


Short of living in a bubble, most people find exposure to environmental allergens extremely difficult to avoid, especially in the spring, as pollen and mold spores swirl through the air and hitch rides into our homes on clothes and pets. 


To ease the resulting allergy symptoms, we often turn to medications. But which are the most effective?


To read more, click here

April 17, 2018

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Japan to trial 'world's first urine test' to spot cancer


Yahoo!


A Japanese firm is poised to carry out what it hailed as the world's first experiment to test for cancer using urine samples, which would greatly facilitate screening for the deadly disease.


Engineering and IT conglomerate Hitachi developed the basic technology to detect breast or colon cancer from urine samples two years ago.


To read more, click here

Week of April 13, 2018

April 7, 2018

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Many People Taking Antidepressants Discover They Cannot Quit


The New York Times 


Victoria Toline would hunch over the kitchen table, steady her hands and draw a bead of liquid from a vial with a small dropper. It was a delicate operation that had become a daily routine — extracting ever tinier doses of the antidepressant she had taken for three years, on and off, and was desperately trying to quit.


To read more, click here

April 8, 2018

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What Muscle Has To Do With Breast Cancer Survival


Forbes 


Want more evidence that muscles are good? Not mussels, as in the shellfish often served with garlic and wine, but muscles, as in strong. Well, a study published in JAMA Oncology found that women with low muscle mass were significantly less likely to survive Stage 2 or 3 breast cancer.  


To read more, click here

April 8, 2018

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Some basic acts of kindness found to help patients dealing with cancer


Washington Post 


Cancer may not be life-ending, but it usually is life-changing. A cancer diagnosis instantaneously turns life upside down for patients and families. Cancer care is a “high-emotion” service, and the care team must not only effectively treat the disease but also address patients’ intense emotions.


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April 9, 2018

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Bill Of The Month: A Tale Of 2 CT Scanners — One Richer, One Poorer



NPR


Benjamin Hynden, a financial adviser in Fort Myers, Fla., hadn't been feeling well for a few weeks last fall. He'd had pain and discomfort in his abdomen.  


In October, he finally made an appointment to see his doctor about it. "It wasn't severe," he says. "It was just kind of bothersome. It just kind of annoyed me during the day." 


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April 11, 2018

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Healing process after breast cancer surgery may trigger cancer to spread, study says


USA Today


Doctors have long wondered why breast cancer patients are more likely to see their cancer spread within the first 18 months after a lumpectomy or mastectomy.  


A new study suggests the wound healing that follows surgery may trigger this spread.


To read more, click here

April 11, 2018

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Does talcum powder cause cancer? A legal and scientific battle rages



CNN


Visitors who walk into Deborah Giannecchini's ranch house in Modesto, California, will notice a well-tended garden, four small dogs who greet every visitor with enthusiasm and a sign that hangs prominently displayedin her living room that reads "It's never too late to live happily ever after."


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week of april 6, 2018

March 31, 2018

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Is This Tissue a New Organ? Maybe. A Conduit for Cancer? It Seems Likely.



New York Times 


Researchers have made new discoveries about the in-between spaces in the human body, and some say it’s time to rewrite the anatomy books.


A study published in Scientific Reports this week described a fluid-filled, 3-D latticework of collagen and elastin connective tissue that can be found all over the body, in or near our lungs, skin, digestive tracts and arteries.


To read more, click here

April 1, 2018

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Coffee Must Carry A Cancer Warning Label In California—But Can Coffee Really Cause Cancer?


Women's Health 



It’s no secret that people love coffee. You might even be reading this with a cup in your hand (or if you're Lorelai Gilmore, two cups). 


So it’s a little alarming, then, that a judge in California ruled that coffee companies must carry a warning that their products could cause cancer. You read that right: Coffee might cause cancer, according to the state of California.  


To read more, click here

April 2, 2018

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Can a Keto Diet Slow the Growth of Breast Cancer? 



U.S. News & World Report 


Remember way back in the 1980s and 1990s when fat was the enemy and doctors and nutritionists espoused the virtues of a high-carb, low-fat diet? When a plain baked potato was considered a healthy lunch and eggs, bacon and butter were bad? The food industry jumped on the bandwagon, stripping products of fat and cramming them full of sugar to keep them palatable just so they could label them as low-fat and thus boost sales.


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April 3, 2018

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Breast Cancer Info Removed From Dept of Health Website 


Newsweek 


A webpage that provided breast cancer information on the Department of Health and Human Services' (HHS) website has been removed after an audit found that the information was "very rarely used" and duplicated that of sister agencies. 


"Content about mammogram breast cancer screening remains, informational pages and factsheets about the disease, including symptoms, treatment, risk factors, and public no- or low-cost cancer screening programs, have been entirely removed," said findings from the nonprofit Sunlight Foundation’s Web Integrity Project, which was reported by ThinkProgress.


To read more, click here

April 4, 2018

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Atlanta Struggles To Meet MLK’s Legacy On Health Care


The Washington Post 


While public safety commissioner Bull Connor’s police dogs in 1963 attacked civil rights protesters in Birmingham, Ala., leaders in Martin Luther King Jr.’s hometown of Atlanta were burnishing its reputation as “the city too busy to hate.”


Yet 50 years after the civil rights leader was killed, some public health leaders here wonder whether the city is failing to live up to King’s call for justice in health care. They point to substantial disparities, particularly in preventive care.


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April 6, 2018

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How to Start Working Out



New York Times 


Exercise can protect you from disease, slim your waistline and extend your lifespan. But doing it regularly is easier said than done. Work, stress, relationships and a lack of time can all stand in the way, which is why the vast majority of Americans don’t exercise nearly enough. But the right plan and knowledge about how to structure an exercise routine can help you make it a regular part of your life. Here are ways that you can start a fitness routine – and stick to it – so you can reap the vast benefits of exercise.


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October 2014

October 24, 2014

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Cooking up prevention: 2014 community grantee spotlight


Prevent Cancer Foundation


  Through the support of a Prevent Cancer Foundation community grant, 7,200 African Americans in urban and rural areas in 11 states will receive cookbooks with healthy lifestyle tips on diet, exercise and cancer screening.


With a $10,000 grant from the Foundation, staff at the Georgia Regents University in Augusta, Georgia, have been collecting tips from African American women in Miami, Chicago, Philadelphia and Los Angeles. When the cookbook is finished, 18 community coalitions will help with distribution. 


To read more, click here.